Conflicting demands on your heart, time and energy can make it hard to care for an aging relative. If this sounds familiar, you could benefit from the services of a care manager.

 

A Care Manager provides relief. They work with you and your family member to develop a realistic care plan. The goal of the plan is to maximize your loved one's independence, safety, and quality of life. A solid care plan addresses family resources. This includes making sure you are not called upon to do more than you are able.

 

A Care Manager is a guide and an advocate. These experts are typically trained in the health professions or social work. Many have specialities in elder care. They bring to their role an understanding of the

  • local healthcare system;
  • emotional and physical challenges of aging and/or disability;
  • difficulties of adult children juggling work and family;
  • common legal and financial issues that arise in later life;
  • local housing options and other senior or disabled services.

 

Care Managers use a holistic approach. they begin with a thourough assessment of needs and capabilities. They can often resolve uncertainties and dispel family disagreements. Their emotional support may help your loved one come to terms with this new phase of life.

 

A Care Manager's input may save you time and money. After looking at money and other family resources, they can recommend appropriate housing situations. They can identify veteran assistance and other benefits. They can avoid duplication of medical services and potentially catch problems before a crisis blooms. they can also monitor the quality of care.

 

A Care Manager works independently as the client's advocate. They are not paid through referral fees. Nor are they employees of hospitals or insurance companies. In some cases, their services can be reimbursed by long-term care insurance.

 

This article reprinted with the permission of Cornerstone Hospice.